Low Impact Workouts For Large Outcomes

Low-Impact-Workouts-For-Large-Outcomes-Bellevue-Washington

Don’t confuse “low impact” with “easy.” There’s a time and place for low-impact exercise, even among the most well-seasoned athletes.

Whether you’re cross training for an otherwise strenuous exercise regimen, returning to exercise after an injury or illness, or suffer from arthritis or joint pain, low-impact exercises can help you lose weight, gain strength, improve endurance, and tone up-all without pain.

 

CYCLING

What makes it low impact:

With Indoor Cycling, the feet never strike the ground so the body doesn’t have to support any additional weight. Work up a sweat without stressing joints.

Feel good factor:

Make your ride more comfortable on the hips, knees and ankles. Show up early to get a custom bike fit from the instructor. You’ll be all set for that specific class and understand how to position the seat and handlebars for future classes.

Boost your burn:

You’ll be led through hill and speed drills, so add enough resistance to challenge yourself! Keep the pace under 120 RPMs (revolutions per minute). You should never feel like the legs are spinning out of control or as if you’re on a bike without chains.

BARRE

What makes it low-impact:

Small, toning movements make muscles feel like they’ve been worked harder than ever, but joints get a break since this class is designed to prevent overuse injury or strain in joints.

Feel good factor:

If pliés stress your knees, try a wider foot stance, or if you’re returning from a shoulder injury, skin the hand weights and complete the arm portion of class without them.

Boost your burn:

Sit deeper in your pilés and squats. Make sure to control muscles in leg lifts rather than swinging the legs and using momentum. Sometimes slower can be actually more challenging.

YOGA

What makes it low impact:

Yoga helps the body stretch, strengthen and the mind de-stress. A body with stronger and more flexible muscles is less likely to develop pain and injury and a mind with less stress leads to a body that moves with more ease.

Feel good factor:

In every Group Fitness class, you’re encouraged to listen to your body, but especially in yoga. At absolutely anytime during class, you can rest in child’s pose or Downward Facing Dog. In addition, the slower pace of most yoga classes often allows for personalized adjustments and attention.

Boost your burn:

The instructor frequently suggests various levels of the same pose. To build more strength, flexibility and confidence, try a new variation or pose. If it seems scary at first, attempt the pose one baby step at a time and know that everyone else go there the very same way.

PILATES

What makes it low impact:

Pilates is all about symmetry and stabilization of the body and health of the spine. With stable joints, balanced strength through both sides of the body and a limber spine, you’ll be more equipped for other sports and activities. This makes Pilates a great cross-training option for athletes.

Feel good factor:

Add props. Most Pilates Mat classes incorporate a few props, which are often useful in making an exercise more comfortable. Try placing a small Pilates ball behind the low back when seated to make the stress out of your hip flexors and low back.

Boost your burn:

Sign up for a private Pilates session. Your instructor will help you access the deepest muscles of your core and help stabilize your shoulders and hips. This will make challenging exercises more accessible and effective.

TRX

What makes it low impact:

TRX challenges muscles while staying easy on the joints. Every exercise requires core engagement and many moves involve balance. Both increase stability and decrease risk of injury in other activities, as well as in daily life.

Feel good factor:

Always keep the TRX traps taut to stay safe and stable. As with cycling, arrive early to familiarize yourself with the equipment and learn how to adjust the straps.

Boost your burn:

Step closer to the anchor pint (the spot where the TRX attaches to the ceiling) and increase the angle of your body to add intensity.

 

Originally from PRO Pulse January-February 2016
By Andrea Blair Cirignano

 

Like that? Try this.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: