Trails in the Great Northwest

Time to explore the great Northwest! Whether it’s with your family, your dog, or just a personal escape, there are multiple reasons to get outdoors. Take your pedometer along to track those extra steps as you burn a few more calories.

The Washington Traits Association (wta.org) offers a first-rate list of hikes in the area. These outings don’t need to be strenuous (although those are also available!). Below are a few of our favorites.

REDMOND WATERSHED PRESERVE

This is a good gentle hike near Redmond with less elevation gain. The Preserve Area is located off NE Novelty Hill Road, which can be easily accessed from 520/Avondale Road in Redmond. This 4.6-mile hike is fairly easy and provides for a pleasant hike around the local wetlands.

PIONEER PARK

This 113-acre forest contains 6.6 miles of trails. The park has been kept in a natural state so that Mercer Island residents can easily enjoy the woods through the course of their daily lives. Roads divide the park into three distinct quadrants.

SEAWARD PARK

Within the Seattle city limits, Seaward Park boasts 300 acres of beautiful forestland. It has an old growth forest, a 2.4 mile bike and walking path, an amphitheater, a native plant garden, miles of hiking trails, beaches, and more.

DISCOVERY PARK

Consisting of 534 acres, Discovery Park is the largest city park in Seattle. Situated on Magnolia Bluff overlooking Puget Sound, the park offers a spectacular view of both the Cascade and Olympic Mountain ranges. The secluded site includes two miles of protected tidal beaches as well as open meadow lands, dramatic sea cliffs, forest groves, active sand dunes, thickets and streams.

MAGNUSON PARK

Located in northeast Seattle along a splendid mile-long stretch of Lake Washington’s shoreline, this former Navy airfield has transformed into a unique combination of features and activities the whole family can enjoy including boating, tennis, swimming, walks, kite flying, and sports fields.

SAINT EDWARD STATE PARK

Once a Catholic seminary, this 316-acre park with 3,000 feet of freshwater shoreline, offers a peaceful environment for nature study including the chance to see bald eagles, otters, and others animals.

 

Originally from PRO Pulse March-April 2015
By Penelope Thompson

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